Castle

Buchatsky castle.

Buchatsky castle.

During the excavations on the territory of the castle, fragments of Gothic architecture of the XIV-XV centuries were found, possibly church architecture. The remaining remaining remains of the walls and towers date back to the XVI century. The walls (up to 3.5 m thick) have 3 tiers of detours with loopholes for firearms.
On the territory of the fortress there was also a palace in the Renaissance style, possibly built on the site of an ancient residential building, the remains of the walls of which are connected to the preserved two tiers of the eastern tower of the castle. The palace was accessed by a ground-floor entrance gate and a drawbridge spanning the moat. The palace was decorated with arcaded galleries. There was a fountain in the middle of the courtyard.
It is known that this outpost was built on the site of a ruined castle of the early period.
The castle was destroyed many times, always later restored. Especially often the process of destruction and restoration took place in the XVI century.due to frequent Tatar, Turkish and Moldavian attacks.
Modern ruins are the remains of a castle built in the middle of the 16th century with the assistance of the then landowners – Buchatsky-Tvorovsky. In the 1580s, another reconstruction of the fortress was completed.
At the beginning of the 17th century, Buchach was one of the most important castles in Podillya. After receiving Buchach in the property (about 1620), Stefan Potocki and his wife Maria Mogilyanka contributed to the strengthening of the castle: its southern part was expanded, two large semicircular bastei were erected from the east and west.
The walls of this part of the fortifications were 4 m thick. On the walls of the castle on the inside, there are stone pillars that were once used for wooden shooting machines. The loopholes were adapted for cross-firing, and wooden battle galleries were built on the upper tiers. In the XVII century. the castle survived many assaults.
In 1676, the fortress was captured and destroyed by the Turks and Crimean Tatars under the leadership of beylerbey Damaske Ibrahim Pasha. The owner of the town, Jan (Janusz) Potocki, quickly rebuilt the castle, as evidenced by the description of 1684.
Written sources of the middle of the XVIII century mention the fortifications in Buchach as already abandoned. In the XIX century, part of the defensive walls were dismantled, the stones were sold as building material. In the castle until the autumn of 1939 were the landowners of the city – Potocki, the last-Count Arthur Potocki.
Monument of architecture of all-Ukrainian significance.
Zolotopototsky castle.
The castle was built at the expense of the governor of Bratslav Stefan Potocki at the turn of the XVI-XVII centuries (approximately in 1568-1631) by order of the King of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth Sigismund III. By the end of the 18th century, it was residential; the family of the owner of the Golden Yana stream (Janusz) lived there permanently) Potocki. It was the main residence of the founder, who loved to be here, his son Jan (Janusz) Potocki. During the Turkish-Tatar invasion and destruction in September 1676, the castle was captured by Turkish-Tatar troops led by Sultan Mehmed IV; the defense lasted 2 days, the castle was surrendered by the defenders.
In September 1676, the castle was captured (by blowing up the walls), destroyed by the Turkish-Tatar army under the leadership of beylerbey Damaske Ibrahim Pasha “Sheitan”. The castle was burned, the most destroyed were the corner and entrance towers.
It was partially rebuilt after the departure of the Turks by the guardians of the then minor owner of the Golden Stream Stefan Alexander Potocki. Restored at the beginning of the XVIII century.
Among the other castles of the Ternopil region, Zolotopototsky can be considered one of the best preserved – although in a state of desolation and partial destruction. The 3 corner towers (except the western one), the gate tower and the walls are still in good condition. The palace is in a dilapidated state.
An architectural monument of national significance.
Podzamochkovsky castle.
Founded in 1600 and with the assistance of the owner of Buchach and the surrounding villages, Jan Krzysztof Buchacki-Tvorowski, or “Jan Zbozhny”), as evidenced by the preserved inscription above the main entrance gate; also the coats of arms of the founders of the castle.
The defense complex is irregular in plan, quadrangular (close to a trapezoid) with a narrowing to the north side, at which a 2-storey palace is built, bounded by 2 five-pointed towers. The entrance-in the southern defensive wall is also flanked with 2 corner towers.
In 1676, the Podzamochkovsky castle was destroyed by parts of the Turkish-Tatar army under the leadership of beylerbey Damasku Ibrahim Shaitan. The castle lost its defensive purpose and was partially converted into housing. Until the 1780s, it belonged to Nikolai Vasily Pototsky. With the approval of the Austrian administration in 1772, the castle was left to its fate. In the 19th century, a paper mill operated at the castle; the walls of the fortress were dismantled for building material.
To this day, the high walls, the massive arch of the southern entrance have been preserved; there are remains of towers, a land rampart, and ruins of rooms.
An architectural monument of national significance.
Yazlovetsky castle.
In the XVI century. it was considered one of the best in Ukraine. It consisted of two parts, the castle itself on a hill and the lower castle with a palace. The castle
was built as a casemate fortification of the lower castle, flanked by two corner bastions, in the period 1644-1659. In 1747, the building was reconstructed, completed with two side wings, including the defensive walls of the lower castle, and turned into a palace.
The portal of the palace from the side of the park facade is particularly magnificent. Its wide semicircular arch is rusticated, three-dimensionally highlighted on the walls by two semi-columns of the Ionic order and relief images of allegories and masks. The monument conveys the characteristic periods of the development of the defense and palace architecture of Podillia in the XVII-XIX centuries.