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Incredible buildings of the world.

Incredible buildings of the world.

British reporter Ben Hebert conducted an original study, finding the most impressive club locations in different parts of the world, whose doors have long been closed, and in the walls there is still a buzz from historical parties and concerts that took place here before.
It is no secret that the peculiarity of the club business in many developed countries of the world is the need to regularly change the location of successful projects. Such rules have long been dictated by the entertainment industry in Moscow, a similar tradition developed in the mid-90s in many European cities.
Therefore, it often happens that investors simply leave the once legendary place in search of new premises, realizing that the peak of profit from the project is already behind, and further indicators will only fall. If we are talking about large locations, the maintenance of which costs a lot of money, then the move should be made in a short time, without waiting for buyers, tenants or sub-tenants for the abandoned location.
Sometimes it happens that truly grandiose premises, the prices for rent or sale of which were at one time greatly inflated, are idle for a year, two or more. But Ben was interested in those cases when the abandoned buildings where the legendary clubs once worked did not find “new residents”, turning into strange ruins of a long-past era of global rave, where the atmosphere of the holiday in the process of natural destruction was replaced by the spirit of fascinating mysticism.
So, 10 incredible photos of abandoned nightclubs from around the world:
Majestyk Nightclub (Leeds, United Kingdom)
This building with almost a century of history was originally a movie theater, which opened back in 1922 to the delight of an astonished audience. Majestic Cinema operated until 1969 and, after losing the battle with the then new, technically more advanced cinemas, was eventually converted into a seedy entertainment center called Majestic Bingo. Here they played poker, danced to swing and fought for leggy beauties for more than 20 years, until in 1993, Leeds was swept by a powerful wave of rave popularity. The venue, which has historically become the center of night entertainment in the city, was quickly converted to the needs of techno parties and relaunched with the same name: Majestyk.
At first, it was just a rave venue, and a few years later, the Nightclub console was added. For some reason, the owners decided to write these words together. Many famous DJs have performed here, from Rony Size to Simon Posford of Sphongle.
By 2006, the club had lost its former popularity and was closed under the pretext of “for repairs”. But everyone knew that the story was over. By that time, the rabid Ravers had already started families and children, and had already exchanged their green leggings for ties and briefcases.
Tuxedo Royale Nightclub Cruise (United Kingdom)
For many people who were lucky enough to become members of the rave movement in the crazy Britain of the 90s of the last century, this rusty barge is perhaps the most vivid memory of their turbulent youth. Tuxedo Royale Nightclub Cruise was formerly called TSS Dover and was England’s most popular floating nightclub. Today, parties on a steamer moored to the banks of the Dnieper or the Moskva River will not surprise anyone, and 25 years ago to get on an all-night cruise with famous DJs was a dream for many partygoers.
The techno-boat sailed thousands of miles from the early 80s to the early 2000s and finally failed. The ship most often plied the Tyne River in Newcastle, and was later ferried to Middlesbrough. Notably, Tuxedo Royale Nightclub Cruise had a younger sister, Tuxedo Princess (formerly TSS Caledonian Princess). She was entrusted to explore the water horizons on the route from Newcastle to Glasgow, bringing together exotic dance lovers from England and Scotland on board.
Starlight Music Theatre (New York, USA)
The musical theater Starlight, affectionately nicknamed “the tent” in the distant 60s, hosted concerts by such stars as Bob Hope, Johnny Cash and Diana Ross. In fact, Starlight is a huge oval, green-and-yellow-striped canvas tent, under the cover of which almost 2,000 people were comfortably accommodated.
By 1969, the legendary tent was reconstructed, and a full-fledged building appeared on this site, capable of accommodating as many as 3,000 people. Theater and concert activity here declined in the 1970s, and soon Starlight was in a critical financial situation. Nevertheless, the musical theater survived until 1997, largely due to its almost sacred name. Today, it is an abandoned place, indifferent to the municipal authorities, where New York hipsters and poets like to retire.
Millenium Complex (Plymouth, United Kingdom)
The story is close to the one we started with. This building was originally called The Gaumont Palace. In 1931, it was built for the main city cinema. At the very beginning of the 80s, first a bar was opened here, and then a two-story nightclub that was advanced in all respects. In the 90s, ravers from all over the South-West of England came here. The Millenium Complex hosted legendary Dreamscape, Obsession, and Scream parties, and global DJing stars like Carl Cox, John Digweed, Pete Tong, and Sasha were listed here almost as permanent residents.
Time has arranged everything as it pleased, and the center of the club movement has moved to Manchester and London, leaving an abandoned monument of rave culture in the center of provincial Plymouth.
KTV and Nightclub Longgang (Shenzhen, China)
In China, a lot of money has long appeared (in terms of social inequality, there is the same “fun” story as in the CIS countries), but it has not yet come to an understanding of how to properly run a club business. That’s why, traveling around the country, you can meet such strange landscapes-just yesterday, local stars and paparazzi crowded here, and today it became obvious that such an expensive club in the city of Shenzhen is simply not needed. This caricature palace, roughly cut into an old building on the outskirts of the city, only seven years after opening, looks deplorable and pathetic.
Borscht Belt Resort Nightclub (New York, USA) is an
iconic place for the history of American jazz. The fact that today there are ruins that vaguely resemble the most prestigious club and concert hall in New York in the 60s, seems like a crime to local connoisseurs of music, whiskey and cigars with a lot of experience.
Perth Entertainment Center (Perth, Western Australia)
And this property could still be valued at a tidy sum today. Why this unique, huge concert venue for 8,000 people has been empty for many years remains a mystery. At a time when Australia itself did not have a decent local music scene, the desperate promoters of this concert hall managed to hold concerts here by Bob Marley or the AC/DC band. Today, the local theater of the young spectator holds daytime rehearsals here.
Communist Party Headquarters (Buzludzha Mountain, Bulgaria)
This building is a true architectural masterpiece of the communist era, with all the inherent strangeness of that time, a frightening craving for grandeur and gigantomania. From the outside, it looks like a Martian headquarters, but inside it is painted in an original style-something between political propaganda and a mythical epic. It looks fascinating! In Bulgaria, it seems that techno-raves are tight here, otherwise there would have been a kilometer-long queue of Richie Houtin fans at the foot of Mount Buzludzha:)
Watertower Nightclub (New York, USA)
And again we return to the city of dreams! There is no more sophisticated audience than in New York. Inventing new ways of spending leisure time is not a hobby here, but a vital necessity. Especially the original entertainers decided to host guests in the illegally captured old water tower. Cramped, but not offended. Needless to say, over time, for security reasons, the authorities asked the young people to find another place to relax, and the tower remained in proud solitude. Passing by, the locals sigh sadly. The parties here were great!
Diskothek “Schatzi” (Hagennbrunn, Austria)
And finally, the famous photo, which you probably have already seen somewhere. The Schatzi disco in Hagennbrunn, Austria, burned to the ground a few years ago. The club cost several million euros and was very popular. Fortunately, the fire happened at a time when no one was inside. No one was injured in the end. As happens in such cases, the version about an electric short circuit was officially announced, and rumors about the tricks of competitors spread through the streets.
We are more concerned about the photograph itself (our region is no less rich in such stories). It was made by the famous Austrian photographer Matthias Haiker and today costs a lot of money. They say that the work, signed by the author himself, hangs in the office of the new owner of Beatport-media magnate Robert Sillerman. Wonderful gossip!